Russell Carey research

A favorite piece of mine by Andy Goldsworth.
He collected snow from scotland and kept it frozen until the right time to do this project. He created 13 massive snowballs filled with sheep’s wool, branches and even barbed wire that expose themselves when the snowball has melted.
Andy Goldsworthy is renowned throughout the world for his landscape art,  created almost exclusively from natural materials. While most of his  work is created in the countryside, midsummer’s day 2000 brought his  work into the heart of the City of London. Thirteen snowballs, made in  Scotland over the winters of 1998-99 and 1999-2000, had been kept in  cold storage for this event. Each snowball started out at nearly two  metres across, weighing around a ton. Embedded in each one was a  material relating to nature, agriculture or industry — everything from  sheep’s wool to barbed wire. The snowball below contains hair from  highland cattle, and was situated in Smithfield, the meat market in the  centre of London.

A favorite piece of mine by Andy Goldsworth.

He collected snow from scotland and kept it frozen until the right time to do this project. He created 13 massive snowballs filled with sheep’s wool, branches and even barbed wire that expose themselves when the snowball has melted.

Andy Goldsworthy is renowned throughout the world for his landscape art, created almost exclusively from natural materials. While most of his work is created in the countryside, midsummer’s day 2000 brought his work into the heart of the City of London. Thirteen snowballs, made in Scotland over the winters of 1998-99 and 1999-2000, had been kept in cold storage for this event. Each snowball started out at nearly two metres across, weighing around a ton. Embedded in each one was a material relating to nature, agriculture or industry — everything from sheep’s wool to barbed wire. The snowball below contains hair from highland cattle, and was situated in Smithfield, the meat market in the centre of London.

Sean Healy creates paintings of rust, he doesn’t use harsh chemicals just household liquids such as water, lemon juice and vinegars. Hes method is a slow one, he adds liquid bit by bit to build up different layers of rust on sheets of mild steel. Sometimes he even has to layer it up over and over to get a good color.
You can see in his work that it is paintily.
http://www.seanhealy.co/

Sean Healy creates paintings of rust, he doesn’t use harsh chemicals just household liquids such as water, lemon juice and vinegars. Hes method is a slow one, he adds liquid bit by bit to build up different layers of rust on sheets of mild steel. Sometimes he even has to layer it up over and over to get a good color.

You can see in his work that it is paintily.

http://www.seanhealy.co/

Danno,
Danno is an british columbia artist who works with rust. He creates controlled painting-like images. Unlike myself who rusts metal with site specific water, danno uses snow and rain in the outdoors to transform his images from metal:Some artists use paints and brushes on canvas.  Others use chisels on  stone.  What turns my crank is weather and in particular snow and rain.

He doesnt just create controlled images he also leaves them for nature to determine, an intersting concept and one i should experiment with though as my rust work is about different locations and diferent waters touching my metal it wouldnt work as well. I just feel that using the same locations water to crete a rust images is too “samey” so the location aspect adds something more conceptual to an uncontrolable process.
http://www.steelandsnow.com

Danno,

Danno is an british columbia artist who works with rust. He creates controlled painting-like images. Unlike myself who rusts metal with site specific water, danno uses snow and rain in the outdoors to transform his images from metal:
Some artists use paints and brushes on canvas. Others use chisels on stone. What turns my crank is weather and in particular snow and rain.

He doesnt just create controlled images he also leaves them for nature to determine, an intersting concept and one i should experiment with though as my rust work is about different locations and diferent waters touching my metal it wouldnt work as well. I just feel that using the same locations water to crete a rust images is too “samey” so the location aspect adds something more conceptual to an uncontrolable process.

http://www.steelandsnow.com


Jannis Milligan
Jane is a Canadian artist recently completing her studies in Fine art. She paints and works with rust aswell as other material such as glass. She is inspired by nature mainly as an artist. It doesn’t say too much about herself or her pratice on her small website on what shes does. the work just caught my attention as I work with rust as a visual tool rather than a material.
http://janismilligan.com/Home.html

Jannis Milligan

Jane is a Canadian artist recently completing her studies in Fine art. She paints and works with rust aswell as other material such as glass. She is inspired by nature mainly as an artist. It doesn’t say too much about herself or her pratice on her small website on what shes does. the work just caught my attention as I work with rust as a visual tool rather than a material.

http://janismilligan.com/Home.html

Pitt Rivers Museum

Ive been to pits rivers twice now and its always refreshing looking at a exibition organised in an unconventional manner. I like the space, cases, artefacts and the ambience of the room. Its not a white lit space or periodically organised. The low light gives it a “in the cellar” kind of feel to it like it is someones collection being displayed, the way its displayed reflects the nature of the exibition. After visiting I thought about ways I could display my work and how the place and space had influenced me. The main thing i thought about was how to organise my work and how I could group them. My favourite was the mumifeid objects and the totem pole, the totem pole was only recognisable by me from cartoons and other fiction, seeing one in real was amazing. I had some ideas from recolecting my visits here such as, the concept of time and how arefacts have been preserved and kept hidden for centuies before being discover and how the action of puting it in a case or on a pedastool increases its “value” by value i mean its interstingness and perception of importance.

Pits

Kit Williams

The print technition Tom recently got me interested in the artist Kitt Williams, he was made famous by publishing the book “masquarade” an illustrated childrens book which a hidden code. When the code had been worked out it gave the location of a buried gold jewlled hare which the person to crack the code is intitled too. What an amazing idea. Burying artwork as the artwork is an interesting concept, though thats not what happened with Kitt its something I think would be very interesting. I recently wanted a documentary about his recent work after the book on youtube. his newest paintings are very english and very well painted. he crafts intereting wasys to display his paintings and does alot of thinking on what comes off the painting and becomes part of the paiting which isnt paint for more relief/sculpture. I would like to try painting again sometime..

Mark Dion, Thames dig.
Mark Dions work is throughly interesting to me as I enjoy the archeology / found object asect to his work. I have been reading up on his works. He has a performace aspect to his work where spectaters come and watch him and his volunteers “escavate” sites. The 2nd show is were he sets up identification tents and volunteers catagorize and name the found artefacts. The viewers come and view this and ask questions etc participating in the work. His cabnet of curiosties are a show of everything collected and organised. I also have been reading a book on mark dion and was interestd to know that the venice goverment took a harsh eye on his work as it is illegal to take and use venician property and got in alot of trouble. It was intereting how unearthed forgotten about objects become of huge value once discovered. We have simular laws in England on finding treasure.. Wheres the fun of being a treasure hunter gone??  His work “loot” was taken and displayed in a venice gallery. The collection of objects that one would normally find useless or not imporant is sooo interesting to me.
 

Mark Dion, Thames dig.

Mark Dions work is throughly interesting to me as I enjoy the archeology / found object asect to his work. I have been reading up on his works. He has a performace aspect to his work where spectaters come and watch him and his volunteers “escavate” sites. The 2nd show is were he sets up identification tents and volunteers catagorize and name the found artefacts. The viewers come and view this and ask questions etc participating in the work. His cabnet of curiosties are a show of everything collected and organised. I also have been reading a book on mark dion and was interestd to know that the venice goverment took a harsh eye on his work as it is illegal to take and use venician property and got in alot of trouble. It was intereting how unearthed forgotten about objects become of huge value once discovered. We have simular laws in England on finding treasure.. Wheres the fun of being a treasure hunter gone??  His work “loot” was taken and displayed in a venice gallery. The collection of objects that one would normally find useless or not imporant is sooo interesting to me.


 

Joseph Beuys 700 oaks.
Trees were planted and as they were planted a stone was placed next to it. As the tree grows and matures the stone doesnt, it stays the same.
I have been meaning to create something of the sort where a static object is in presence of a changing object for comparison. This involving the ocean, lakes and rivers or ever burying items for periods of times.
my work refelcts this as my current scukpture expreiments have been about time and change. Not to the extent as this work but still.
When I look at this peice I refelct on myself, it gives you the feeling of age and growing up, at face value. If i was around these trees a lifetime I would grow up with them with the stone present reminding you of a starting point.

Joseph Beuys 700 oaks.

Trees were planted and as they were planted a stone was placed next to it. As the tree grows and matures the stone doesnt, it stays the same.

I have been meaning to create something of the sort where a static object is in presence of a changing object for comparison. This involving the ocean, lakes and rivers or ever burying items for periods of times.

my work refelcts this as my current scukpture expreiments have been about time and change. Not to the extent as this work but still.

When I look at this peice I refelct on myself, it gives you the feeling of age and growing up, at face value. If i was around these trees a lifetime I would grow up with them with the stone present reminding you of a starting point.